The ways hacker follow to hack peoples account

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Today we are going to discuss about how and ways hackers use to hack account of different people.

Who is a hacker?

A security hacker is someone who explores methods for breaching defenses and exploiting weaknesses in a computer system or network.

To protect your account from been hacked you need to create a strong password.

What is password?

A password, sometimes called a passcode is secret data, typically a string of characters, usually used to confirm a user’s identity.

Here are the ways

1. Shoulder surfing

Shoulder surfing is one of the most rudimentary but effective techniques available to hackers, given the right context and target.Somewhat self-explanatory, shoulder surfing simply sees hackers peering over the shoulder of a potential target, looking to visually track keystrokes when entering passwords. This could take place in any public space like a coffee shop, or even on public transport such as a flight.

Someone may be accessing in-flight internet to complete a task before landing and the hacker could be sitting nearby, watching for an opportunity to note down a password to an email account. If you work from public places on a regular or even semi-regular basis, it is worth considering using a device fitted with technology to prevent prying eyes from seeing what’s on the display. HP’s EliteBooks often come with the option to configure a device with a Sure View privacy screen, for example. Other third-party options are also available from online retailers that can simply be placed over most laptop displays, and they’re affordable too.

2. Social engineering

Social engineering typically refers to the process of tricking users into believing the hacker is a legitimate agent. A common tactic is for hackers to call a victim and pose as technical support, asking for things like network access passwords in order to provide assistance. This can be just as effective if done in person, using a fake uniform and credentials, although that’s far less common these days.

3. Phishing

Phishing is among the most common password-stealing techniques currently today and is often used for other types of cyber attacks. Rooted in social engineering tactics, its success is predicated on being able to deceive a victim with seemingly legitimate information while acting on malicious intent.

Usually carried out through email, success with phishing can also be achieved with other communication forms such as over SMS text messaging, known as ‘smishing’.Phishing typically involves sending an email to a recipient while including as many elements within the email as possible to make it appear legitimate that’s Grammar, company signatures, correct spelling and more sophisticated attacks recently attach onto existing email threads with phishing coming later in the attack chain.The attackers will try and encourage the user into downloading and opening a malicious document or another type of file – usually malware – to achieved with other communication forms such as over SMS text messaging, known as ‘smishing’.Phishing typically involves sending an email to a recipient while including as many elements within the email as possible to make it appear legitimate that’s Grammar, company signatures, correct spelling and more sophisticated attacks recently attach onto existing email threads with phishing coming later in the attack chain.

The attackers will try and encourage the user into downloading and opening a malicious document or another type of file – usually malware – to achieve whatever the attacker wants. This could be stealing passwords, infecting them with ransomware, or even staying stealthily hidden in the victim’s environment to act as a backdoor for future attacks performed

4. Rainbow Tables

Whenever a password is stored on a system, it’s typically encrypted using a ‘hash’, or a cryptographic alias, making it impossible to determine the original password discover in a company’s system.

Much of the computation is done before the attack takes place, making it far easier and quicker to launch an attack, compared to other methods. The downside for cyber criminals is that the sheer volume of possible combinations means rainbow tables can be enormous, often hundreds of gigabytes in size.

5. Brute force attacks

This involve hackers using a variety of methods, usually on a trial-and-error basis, to guess their way into a user’s account. This could see attackers simply trying to use commonly used passwords like ‘password1234’ against a known username.A brute force attack can also take the form of an attacker making educated guesses. For example, the username may already be known and the attacker may even know the victim personally, so guesses related to known birth dates, favourite sports teams, and family members’ names could all provide clues to the correct password, such as safiya456.

They are some what similar to dictionary attacks but often lack the associated sophistication, automation, and computational complexity without the corresponding hash. In order to bypass this, hackers maintain and share directories that record passwords and their corresponding hashes, often built from previous hacks, reducing the time it takes to break into a system.Rainbow tables go one step further, as rather than simply providing a password and its hash, these store a precompiled list of all possible plain text versions of encrypted passwords based on a hash algorithm. Hackers are then able to compare these listings with any encrypted passwords they discove
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